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20110701
20110731
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 35
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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
? >> tuesday shaping up to be a very big day in parliament. in the morning we are expecting a senior policeman, including the one that put it last night, to appear before the committee. they will be questioned and questioned again about this cozy relationship. also, of course, at the handling of the original investigations into phone hacking. the biggest set piece will be in the afternoon, when they will hear from rupert and james murdock, separately from rebecca brooks, who resigned from her post at news international on friday. >> plenty going on. i know it will keep you busy. >> other stories making headlines around the world today, let's check with thailand and cambodia, ordered to withdraw their troops. the united nations highest court ordered troops to leave the land. a number of people were killed, thousands fled their homes. the postal service website has been hacked into by a group calling itself the union of free syrian hackers. they ended a message with the slogan -- the people want to finance the egyptian revolution. three people have been killed in chile. the government says that
, i think first of all the president realizes we have to get a big deal. as we discussed a couple of weeks ago or last week, charlie, if you don't send the appropriate signal to international financial communities, you can raise the debt ceiling but the interest costs are going to go through the roof. so it has to be a big deal and so i think he recognizes that. and i think speaker boehner subpoena looking at the reality of what's going to happen in 2013 without agreeing to what the president said. we're going to have 4.9% increases on taxes on everybody earning er $200,000 a year anyway just from the affordabl care act. so you'll see significant increase in taxes withoutany increased taxes put on the table. i think they can do a deal and i think a deal can get done if, in fact, we do take away a lot of the tax eendires and lower the rates so thatwe get an economic boom that would come a that. so i think it's still possible. i think things tend to happen in washington when they have to so my slope that something will come togher and occur. >> rose: how long do you think it will ta
about him. i think the privacy of young children is a big issue. >> hell do you think that your son's medical condition, -- how do you think that your son's medical condition, cystic fibrosis, was leaked out? >> i have never talked publicly about his condition, and obviously we wanted that to be kept private, for all the obvious reasons that you want to do the best buy your children. i have never complained about what happened to me before, but the truth is information did come all. i was approached by a the "sun" newspaper. they told me they had this information about his condition and that they were going to run this story. >> how did that affect you as a father? >> in tears. your son is going to be broadcast across the media. sarah and i are incredibly upset about it. we're thinking about his long- term future, thinking about our family. but there is nothing you can do about it. you are in public life. you do not know how it has appeared, i have not questioned it, make any allegations or claims, but the fact is he did appear, and it did appear in "the sun" newspaper. >> i think i
of either of our two parties right now. and i think that is the big challenge right now. how do we basically develop a political platform and a mandate to do those four things. >> i would add a couple things. to what tom said which i basically agree with. but first there is a cultural element here. it's not just a problem in washington, it's a pblem in the culture. a nation where people have distrust of authority, don't trust government, unwilling to accept sacrice, feel very threatened, want pore government than they are willing to pay for, and so there has to be a gigantic education campaign to go under that. and then the second thing i would add, and tom talked about a hybrid politics, i uld say we'vead it. and we just have to rediscover it. and i go back perpeally to my hero alex aner hamilton who created this hrid politics it was not -- he got us out of the big government versus small government debat he stood for lited b energetic government to enhance social mobility. so people in the hamiltonian practise decision which include the wig party and the lincoln an republican party at the
chat or call without leaving facebook. this is big for facebook. this is not so revolutionary for the users. >> are these the kind people that actually want to have video chat and video conferences? i thought that was more of a work scenario. >> with any audience, this kind of a video chat behavior is for the minority of your interactions because if you are in a certain place, once you introduce visual and audio cues, you have to have a controlled environment. i cannot have a video chat with you while i'm on the bus. this is by definition a rich interface for a minority of your communications. nonetheless, they spoke with like this to happen within facebook and not have you leave facebook and have you use your skype program. >> one thing that seems to be clear is that the business side, this comes in the same week that google has announced its social network is try to take on facebook as well. who was winning that battle? >> if you measure this on sheer numbers, no one touches facebook. during the announcement, they mentioned they have 750 million users. that is a big jump fro
on the show time series the big c. here's a look at that series. >> the doctor. oh, pardon me, sir. dr. sherman, hi. my name's kathy. >> i'm the nurse. >> you're not a drug rap, are you? >> no, no, i'm not. i'm a dying woman who is trying to see the right doctor and ask him if he s any advice on how to save my life. the best i can do is spend the last two hours a day on hold from your office to find out if anyone's canceled. that's not okay. >> i'm going to asyou to leave. >> i will not leave. >> charlie: the big c is currently airing on show time mondays at 10:30 p.m. i'm pleased to have laura lean -- laura linney back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: when you look at that, what do you think? >> it's a weird, you know sort of tapestry of what you feel and i always feel slightly embarrassed when i look at myself. >> charlie: really? you don't look at this clinically and say i can't wait to have somebody watch it. >> i also good off camera. i give performances off camera to people who would never -- i mean, on camera i try my best. but there's, the further i get awa
to spread? >> italy and spain are the big ones. it is impossible for the rest of the euro zone. it is too big. you would have to end up with the european central bank owning an enormous chunk. it becomes really serious. that looks like possibilities. the euro zone is running a out of countries to finance. >> turning to this country, here in the states, congress has its own budget crisis. if it does, what impact is the point to have on world markets? it is ironic that the u.s. is the most creditworthy countries in the world. that is almost voluntarily, the cutting default when it does the have to. if it did, that would create chaos throughout the global financial system. >> thank you very much for joining us. you are watching "bbc world news america." rare world elements are rare. u.s. is seeking a production into high gear. in moscow today, the celebrations were under way for the anniversary of the cathedral. on the edge of rex -- that of red square, it has then restored to its glory. >> the unique, st. basil's cathedral. bill during the era of ivan the terrible. when it was finished, he
casualties and afghanistan have increased. as the funeral starts for big thumbs of the mumbai bomb attack, indian authorities blame terrorists for the blast that killed 20 and left dozens injured. hello and welcome to gmt. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and the former editor of the "news of the world" newspaper has agreed to be questioned by british mp's over the phone hacking scandal. the committee is taking further steps. rupert murdoch's news corp. has a knowledge it cannot be business as usual and it has dropped its full takeover bid, at least for now of bskyb. news international is refusing to comment on who may or may not appear before the mp's. nick clegg, deputy prime minister, has urged senior members to attend. >> my message is to do the decent thing. you cannot hide away from this level of public anguish and anger. when you are in that position of power, you are also accountable to millions of people who consume the product of your newspapers, television channels. make yourself available. if you feel you have been wrong. you feel you have been maligned, the se
cannot have people call into question whether we will pay our bills or not. that's a big issue. what is driving this behind-the- scenes -- republicans took control of the house with a group of people who are not politicians. they are business owners and have a natural distrust of government. it's a disconnect between the people in congress and the reality. everyone is saying it will have huge impacts. here we are a couple of weeks before the united states cannot pay its obligations, and we're having a fight. >> thank you very much. >> thank you for having me. >> still to come on gmt -- crowds braved the brain in london ahead of tonight's premiere of the final film about .he boy blizwizard >> the duke and duchess of cambridge continue their tour of north america. the royal couple is in calgary at the world famous annual rodeo. they visited a town that has recently been devastated by forest fires. >> two months ago, it was a town in despair. william and kate had asked to visit the town in alberta on what had been planned as a private day for them. they walked through the wreckage of pe
. today, the big employers here are oil and farming, but the biggest employer of all by far, is the u.s. government, in the form of the military. when america boom, bakersfield. . -- when america boomed, b baker'so feel toomed. all across the south, there are the same problems, not enough credit to solve the housing market. >> general david petraeus is regarded as one of america's best and brightest. he's about to begin a new job as head of the cia. our diplomatic editor has been talking to general petraeus on his way home from afghanistan about america's longest war and other matters. >> nato forces in afghanistan have a new commander. general david petraeus is on the way home. he had been expected to serve longer but has been recalled to head the cia. the force he is leaving behind is now being quicker than he recommended. the insurgency has shown itself capable of hitting back with the assassinations and spectacular attacks. nato insists that they're winning. i asked the general what the possible grounds for optimism could be. >> what we have seen now is developing into a trend. i
a big prize from the failure of the takeover. bskyb's share prices falling around 20% over the past nine days. taking away almost 3 billion pounds from the value of the company. what has rupert murdoch lost? >> this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire 100% of the business which is extraordinarily good prospects, which has a growth trajectory which is well understood. it would have substantially increased the size of the company from around 20% to 25%. >> we may think mr. murdoch is big in the u.k., but he is much bigger in the u.s. the worry for him is that u.s. senators are now on his days following the accusation that 9/11 victims and other families phones or hacked. >> if that is true and if there was any access to any of the victims records, then, you know, in my mind, it would probably be the most invasive and perverse information in's the final moments of their lives and a tremendous innovation to their families as well. >> 1989, the dawn of television's new age. >> mr. murdoch would see himself, rightly many would say, as the founder of bskyb. so to be told by politicia
of reasons for this we can discuss-- is as high as it's been. >> rose: so that's really one of the big questions. >> in europe it's the same thing. >> rose: u.s. leadership. >> yeah. >> rose: what is it you thi they expect from the united states in 2011 and twelve after all that's taken place? the economic collapse that we had. the wars we were engaged in andn in different levels. what does the world want from america? >> well, leadersh, i think, is the short answer to the question. but we can start with asia and go to europe and go to the middle east. in asia, they want the ited states to be present. they wanthe united states that ey can count on to meet its obligations anpromises t ales and partners, and we have been doing that. you know, this is a mistake... not mistake. it's not a coincidence that secretary clinton took her first trip as secretary of state to asia. >> rose: and she's back in india as we speak. since dean rusk in 1961. and we have really engaged... they want u.s. presence. i think the asians want to see the unitedtates engaged and, by the way, they want us to manage
, they are plagued by a crisis of confidence. they're concerned with the really big question that dominated all of american politics. how do you regrouped project america when the government is running out of money and the people are no longer prepared to pay more in taxes? this man looks like your typical computer science professor. he could really do with a new bicycle. he can certainly afford it. in a light 90's, he had two students, an enterprising duo that promised him a share in their new business if he gave him their advice. how much are you actually were? >> i don't like to answer that question. -- how much are you actually worth? >> more than a billion? >> that would not be completely inaccurate, let me put it that way. >> and billionaire professor who carries his own chipped tea mug. he is probably the richest academic in the world. he worries that in obama's america, wealth has become a dirty word. >> we should be empowering these people. we should be encouraging the next generation but i think there is almost a hostile attitude towards the people that have been successful in this co
the united states went into iraq in 2003, 2004, they appointed a viceroy, jerry bremer, who made four big decisions right away. can you run down those decisions and what was the aftermath of those decisions? >> the decisions had to do with this bending the army, outlined -- disbanding the army, putting thousands out on the streets without jobs. he united men with guns with men with ideas, fighting -- feeding into the insurgency. >> so that party was out. the police were out, the army was out. there was some kind of nationalization of industries or something like that? >> again, trying to get rid of the state-and entities to make it more efficient. >> and there were no state-run entities? >> there was a virtual government that did not have much of 40 -- much authority . >> what is the definition of insurgency? >> people have different definitions. in the case of iraq, it was forces opposed to the government taking up arms and using violence. that is certainly what we saw there, primarily by the sunni tribes. the chaos in iraq provided the opportunity for al qaeda to move in. so you had thi
much and british officers say privately they are -- there is still a big problem with corruption. nato's deployment has peaked. the question now is will the afghans be able to do the job of the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> that is the question indeed. on the ground, the fighting continues. in washington, three american senators, three -- two democrats and one republican pended op-ed in the "new york times" which called for a more rapid withdrawal of all american combat troops. tom udall is among those arguing the case. thank you for joining me. you criticize president obama for not bringing back american troops fast enough from afghanistan. what would you like him to do? >> the thing we have to realize is the thing we went in with objectives. those objectives were displacing a government that was harboring terrorists. terrorist camps, al qaeda was hooked up with them, and osama bin laden was in the region. now we have an elected government, we have completely changed the landscape, we have trained approximately 400,000 afghans in terms of army and police.
and the world. but republicans say they will only raise the debt limit if the government makes big spending cuts. opposition democrats argue taxes must rise to, especially for the rich, but to rain -- rein in the debt. >> the distance they seem to have to bridge in the short timeframe is pretty significant. a lot of people are concerned, everyone is talking like they are going to get a deal but they definitely have some work to do and someone is going to of to get pretty significantly in the near term. >> so far the political left and right have refused to compromise on their tax and spending ideas. and yet, america of's treasury start -- a debt default by the world's biggest economy is still a worst case scenario. but it is one that is getting closer by the day. bbc news, new york. >> let's move on, because your's efforts to impose an emission charged on the world airlines -- europe's efforts to impose an initial charge of the world airlines. there demanding the plan to be struck down claiming it overstepped its jurisdiction it means all airlines must buy permits to cover carbon emissions regar
, the big difference between them... >>. >> rose: she was more hard line than he was and it'said she is even today in the councils of government. that she was more allied with bob gates than she was... >> yeah, that was the big difference during the campaign between them and that was what got oba doing soell in iowa was his rly opposition. >> rose: she supported the war even though it was just based on a speech that he'd written. so the last question is what's it going to take so that this is no longer true? >> think that it's going to be with us, charlie, for a very, very long time. and the reason i say that is that as the years go by it isn't that apresident has to think about vietnam, because vietnam has now insinuated itself int the d.n.a. of every presidt. now you think of code words. you think out having a clear exit strategy. >> rose: right. >> of giving clear instructions to the military. what are you really saying? you're really saying "i don't want another vietnam," but you don't articulate the word. you live the thought, the very essence of it. and that essence is now deeply embed
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)